Category Archives: MKTG 310 (NEW)

MKTG 310 Week 7 Case Study Never Stay Here The Power of Negative Online Reviews NEW

MKTG 310 Week 7 Case Study Never Stay Here The Power of Negative Online Reviews NEW

Case Study
Read the case “Never Stay Here! The Power of Negative Online Reviews” on page 537 of your text. Please answer the questions at the end of the case. Incorporate at least two outside sources into your answers, and properly reference them within and at the end of your paper. Remember to use the Case Study Guide in Doc Sharing. Also, DeVry University requires APA format for papers.
Submit your assignment to the Dropbox, located at the top of this page. For instructions on how to use the Dropbox, read these step-by-step instructions.
See the Syllabus section “Due Dates for Assignments & Exams” for due date information.

If you book a hotel for your next vacation, you will likely view ratings from TripAdvisor. As the world’s largest travel site, TripAdvisor has integrated their review system with over 500 major travel partners including online booking site Kayak and leading hotel chains Wyndham, Best Western, and Four Seasons.
TripAdvisor is an online opinion leader whose influence comes from a community of travelers. How important are online reviews? Boston-based Cone Communications research revealed that 89 percent of consumers say they find online channels to be trustworthy sources for product and service reviews. In addition, Cone’s research showed that four-out-of-five consumers have changed their minds about a recommended purchase based solely on negative information they found online.
Since online reviews are important, the challenge to marketers is how to manage the reviews, especially the dreaded negative reviews. Everyone knows all reviews cannot be positive, but there are ones that strike a chord of fear for hospitality companies: bed bugs, dirty sheets, discourteous front desk staff . . . the list goes on. The question for every hotel: how do we respond to negative reviews?
T here are several options for handling negative reviews. Obviously, the first option is to do nothing at all, and many hotels go this route. The small hotel owner is incredibly busy, so following and responding to online reviews may fall low on his or her list of daily priorities. Perhaps these owners are not social media savvy or they are unaware of social media monitoring tools that will make tracking and responding to comments easier. Some of the more sophisticated monitoring tools are expensive, beginning at $800 a month; that might be beyond the marketing budget for a small business.
Still, most marketers agree that listening and responding to negative reviews is the best strategy. Several hotel chains, including Red Roof Inns, require managers of individual properties to respond to every negative online review. The responses themselves can be tricky; what do you say? It’s clear that the overall goal of the response is to satisfy the reviewer and to change the public perception of your property. If the reviewer appears incorrect, how can the hotel politely attempt to correct the information without insulting the reviewer or creating an online argument?
If a reviewer has a truly bad experience, many hotels consider the guest deserving of a discount or a free night at the hotel. But hotels must be careful not to publicly promote this reward or less ethical reviewers might intentionally write bad reviews in the hopes of getting free nights at the hotel.
TripAdvisor has features to help hotels with some of these obstacles. The hotel can send a private message via the TripAdvisor message system offering a coupon to the customer. If the hotel feels a review is incorrect, t here is an opportunity to report the review as inappropriate to TripAdvisor in the hopes of removal or correction.
Some businesses have gone more extreme in their reactions to negative reviews. T here are a few reports of hotels fining their customers as much as $500 for a bad review. The customer is warned in the fine print of the contract and hotels are deducting the fee from the credit card used at check-in. T here are also several cases of small businesses suing customers for defamation in their online reviews.
Online reviews are important for business survival and revenue growth. One study revealed that a one-star increase in a Yelp rating (Yelp is a leading online review site) can lead to as much as a 9 percent increase in revenue. In the competitive world of hotel marketing, social media marketing and visitor review sites will continue to gain influence on travelers’ choices.
Discussion Questions
1.  CS12-1 What steps do you recommend a hotel take when dealing with a negative online review?
2.  CS12-2 Do you use online reviews when choosing a hotel or restaurant? How much do these comments influence your choices?

 

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MKTG 310 Week 6 Video Case Study Nike (2 Papers) NEW

MKTG 310 Week 6 Video Case Study Nike (2 Papers) NEW

This Tutorial contains 2 Papers

Nike’s impressive portfolio includes some of the strongest brand names in the world. How does lifestyle play a crucial factor in Nike’s brand success? What are some of the challenges and benefits associated with being the market leader in so many categories?

With social media becoming increasingly important and fewer people watching traditional commercials on television, what does Nike need to do to maintain its strong brand images?

What risks do you feel Nike will face going forward?

 

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MKTG 310 Week 5 Case Study Furnishing An Experience Jordan Furniture (2 Papers) NEW

MKTG 310 Week 5 Case Study Furnishing An Experience (2 Papers) NEW

This Tutorial contains 2 Papers

Case Study FURNISHING AN EXPERIENCE
Evaluate the shopping experience at Jordan’s. Why is it so successful?
1.      If Jordan’s were building a new location near colleges, what might they include in their stores to draw young customers?
2.      How has Jordan’s used the brand community around the Boston Red Sox to its’ advantage? What other communities could it use?

 

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MKTG 310 Week 3 Drinking and Driving Recommendation Memo (2 Papers) NEW

MKTG 310 Week 3 Drinking and Driving Recommendation Memo (2 Papers) NEW

This Tutorial contains 2 Papers

Audio You Decide Changing Attitudes – Drinking and Driving You are in charge of a very limited marketing budget for a non‐profit organization whose mission is to stop drinking and driving among college students. It’s your job to educate the marketing committee about how your organization can change attitudes among college students. Assume you attending a meeting and hear the following exchange. Board member: Okay, I’ll admit it. My kids are grown and I have no idea what college students think these days. How are we going to understand their attitudes about drinking and driving? Who do we ask? I want to make sure we have accurate information about student attitudes—attitudes we know are honest and representative of the target audience. Without this information, we cannot create a convincing communications plan. I want to make sure we lead with the right message, and I want to make sure we know how to measure the impact of our efforts. There is no room for guessing here—I want to make sure we’re listening first, and then delivering message with truth, impact, and measurable results! Social Media Specialist: This is not an easy task. Budget aside, we need to make sure we identify meaningful reference groups for college students. Students will listen to their peers if we target the right reference groups and come forward with a no‐nonsense, honest message. Credibility is critical. We need to make drinking and driving their issue—not ours. But back to the budget for a minute—I’m concerned we have limited resources to identify and target these reference groups. Marketing Director: We have a budget for research, creative, and media placement. It’s not much, but keep in mind we have an advantage with this audience. With a message like this one, we can do the whole campaign online. That’s the best way to get the maximum impact with a target audience of college students. But we need to concentrate on the details. We need to understand existing attitudes, identify the reference groups, listen and find the way to change attitudes about drinking and driving for the better. – And know the best places to reach our students, where they will both pay attention to and be receptive toward our message.

 

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MKTG 310 Week 2 Video Assignment Video Does Green NEW

MKTG 310 Week 2 Video Assignment Video Does Green NEW

View Chapter 4 video Does Green and answer the following questions.


Question #1
80–90% of American consumers are aware of environmental issues, yet
fewer consumers translate their concern into action? Write two
paragraphs explaining why fewer consumers translate their concern into
action.
Question #2
Can marketing help us align our individual personal needs with long-term community benefits? Explain your answer in two paragraphs.

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MKTG 310 Week 1 Case Study Honda’s ASIMO NEW

MKTG 310 Week 1 Case Study Honda’s ASIMO NEW

Case Study Honda’s ASiMO Meet ASIMO! He is 4 feet tall, with a pleasant childish voice, and the ability to recognize and interact with people; however, ASIMO is no child. He is the humanoid robot “brainchild” of scientists at Honda. ASIMO’s technology includes two camera eyes to map its environment and recognize unique faces. Its body construction is so humanlike that it can run at 3.5 mph, toss a ball to play with a child, and use its opposable thumbs to open a bottle and serve you a cold drink. ASIMO is the perfect household companion. Honda has not yet made ASIMO available to purchase for home use but it is only a matter of time until families can have their own humanoid robot. But not everyone is interested. Consumers are a bit nervous about a robot serving them meals or sitting down and telling them the news of the day. Why? Perhaps it is Hollywood’s influence on our perception of robots. It might not be the sweet WALL­E that comes to mind when we think about robots, but the Terminator or another threatening machine. If consumers are not ready for ASIMO, perhaps they are ready for some of its features. Facial Recognition Technology (FRT), the ability for a computer to “read” your face, is seeing strong development and application. According to some analysts, the FRT market is expected to grow from $1.92 billion to $6.5 billion within the next 5 years. Advertisers and big brands are taking notice of FRT. Imagine a billboard in a mall that advertises Abercrombie to a teen girl and Target to a busy mom. Immersive Labs is one company that has developed digital billboards that measure the age range, gender, and even attention level of a passerby to deliver a tailored ad. According to researchers, FRT can do more than read your face and estimate general physical characteristics. It can map out a biometric profile that is as unique as your fingerprint. Red Pepper is a company that uses this advanced technology to develop Facedeals, a smartphone app that provides personalized offers to consumers. Here’s how it works. You download the app, walk into a store with a Facedeals camera, and are recognized. Facedeals interfaces with your Facebook information, analyzing your content for favorite brands, relationship status, places visited, and other information. Then, Facedeals presents you with a personalized offer. The marketing applications for FRT are numerous. Google is considering letting individuals use a body motion, perhaps a “wink” or “eyebrow movement,” as their FRT password. Forbes.com has unveiled an app where your webcam watches your facial responses when you view ads to learn what products and ads you like and dislike. Many brands know one key to successful marketing is to offer the right product to the right consumer at the right time. With FRT, marketers can achieve this goal at a whole new level. Discussion Questions CS 1­1 What are the most likely market segments for ASIMO? CS 1­2 How could Honda overcome resistance to the idea of a home robot? CS 1­3 What concerns might consumers have regarding FRT?

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